Rescuers are working to free two other injured climbers from Eurasia’s tallest active volcano after an accident claimed the lives of five climbers, according to Russian news sources on Saturday.

The disaster happened around 500 meters below the 4,750-meter (15,884-foot) summit of the Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano, according to the prosecutor’s office of the Kamchatka area. The climbers were attempting to reach the volcano’s top at the time.

According to the accounts, all of the climbers were Russians. The accident’s specifics weren’t immediately revealed.

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The far northeastern Russian peninsula of Kamchatka is famous for its variety of active and dormant volcanoes, hot springs, and a wealth of animals.

FAQs

What is the largest volcano in Russia?

Pika Klyuchevskaya
Known also as Klyuchevskoi (Russian: левско), Klyuchevskaya Sopka is a stratovolcano that is the highest mountain in Siberia and the highest active volcano in all of Eurasia. About 100 kilometers (60 miles) from the Bering Sea, its symmetrical, high cone looms.

In Russia, did a volcano erupt?

Russian volcano Raikoke ejected ash and sulfuric gas 17 kilometers into space on June 22. The last eruption to blast gases that high was Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines blowing its top in 1991. Eruptions that are intense are uncommon.

Is Russia home to a supervolcano?

The Kamchatka peninsula is home to the Russian supervolcano known as Karymshin. Additionally, the globe is at grave risk from its explosion. Although the caldera was discovered in 2007, the most recent eruption occurred 1,3 million years ago.

Do earthquakes occur in Russia?

Russia experiences earthquakes with the highest magnitude on earth. Devastation and destruction can happen within a radius of up to 1000 kilometers in the event of earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 9.0. Earthquakes happen incredibly infrequently when compared to the size of the nation.

Do volcanoes exist in Ukraine?

For instance, the only mud volcano in Ukraine outside of the Crimea, Starunya in the Ivano-Frankivsk area, first erupted in 1977 following an earthquake in Romania.

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Since 2014, Eliza Grace has worked as a reporter covering movies and other forms of media. She is particularly well-known for the humorous way in which she analyses film. On a regular basis, she contributes articles to The Current that are movie reviews as well as articles about the newest movies, video games, and entertainment news. Words from Eliza Grace: "There's a standard formula for success in the entertainment medium and that's: Beat it to death if it succeeds."